English

Home > English > ESL > Area of Study: Belonging > AOS

Belonging extended response activities
(Section II Paper 1)

This material was prepared by Eve Mayes, Condell Park High School.

Paper 1 Section II
Rubric
Time management during the exam
Synthesis of two prescribed belonging texts
Vocabulary to use to improve your extended responses
Belonging extended response questions
Belonging extended response scaffold
Example extended response

And What shall I Write by tomswift46.
There is a Creative Commons license attached to this image. (external website)Attribution (external website)NoncommercialNo Derivative Workshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/tomswift/4837657/

Paper 1 Section II

Paper 1 Section II is the extended response component of the Belonging Language Study within an Area of Study. All candidates undertaking English (ESL) complete this paper.

You will be required to write about the TWO prescribed texts that you have studied in class. You may also be asked to write about a related text of your own choosing.

The question may specify the form of the response, which could include an essay, speech, feature article or interview. You should practise composing a range of extended responses in different forms.

High range responses will clearly identify and discuss language forms, features and techniques as the means for representing belonging or not belonging. These responses will highlight the interrelationships between their two prescribed texts and related text(s).

You should complete past questions for Section II, as well as Paper 1 as a whole in examination conditions to monitor your time management.

Rubric

All HSC examination papers are printed and formatted in the same manner. At the beginning of any question is the rubric, which defines the guidelines or criteria your response will be judged against in determining the mark for particular questions. It is essential that for every HSC question, in any subject, these guidelines are read and considered before composing a response to any question.

Look at English (ESL) Paper 1 (external website).

In 2009 the criteria for Paper I section II was:

In your answer you will be assessed on how well you:

  • demonstrate understanding of the ways language shapes and expresses perceptions
  • organise, develop and express ideas using language appropriate to audience, purpose and context

Time management during the exam

Time your response well to ensure that you discuss both prescribed and related texts and answer all parts of the question.

Section II is worth 20 marks. You should spend 40minutes on this section.

1
There is a Creative Commons license attached to this image. (external website)Attribution (external website)http://www.flickr.com/photos/alancleaver/4293345633/sizes/s/ (external website)

Timing of each section throughout Paper 1 as a whole is important and you should ensure you have a watch or a clear view of a wall clock to maintain a consistent and appropriate pace in completing all sections of the paper. Be aware of the time that you spend on Section I. Take care that you do not spend more than 50 minutes on Section I. Monitor your time as you complete Section II. Ensure that you balance the time that you spend on both prescribed texts.

You should download copies of past papers (external website) and consider the types of questions that have been asked and the text forms that have been specified.

Go To Top

Synthesis of two prescribed belonging texts

Consider some of the comparisons that you can make between your two prescribed texts before writing an extended response. [Note: If one of your prescribed texts is a collection of poems, it may be helpful to fill in one table for every poem, comparing it to your other prescribed text. You may also want to fill in this table for your related text and each of your prescribed texts.]

Fill in the following table to help you plan your extended response:

Texts: _____________________________ and __________________________________

Similarities/ Differences Answers
General similaritiesbetween 1st and 2nd prescribed text.  
Similarities between 1st and 2nd prescribed text with reference to the Rubric statements (at least 3)  
General differences between 1st and 2nd prescribed texts  
Differences between 1st and 2nd prescribed text with reference to Rubric statements (at least 3)  

Download an interactive PDF version of this table.

Go To Top

Vocabulary to use to improve your extended responses

Language of Comparison/ Contrast

Compare Contrast
…akin to…
All the same
Also
…analogous to…
As well
…comparable tohellip;
Equally
Furthermore
Just as…, so too …
In addition
In a similar way,
In like manner
Like…
Likewise
…parallels
…mirrors
Moreover
…reflects
…same as…
Similarly,
Still
Too
At the same time
But
Contrastingly,
Conversely
Despite
…different to…
…distinguishes itself from…
For all that
However
In contrast,
…is not…Rather
Nonetheless
…nothing like…
Notwithstanding
On the contrary,
On the other hand,
There is a difference/ gap/ distinction/ disparity between…
Though
Unlike…
Yet

 

Other words for 'shows' Other words for 'emphasises' Other evaluative terms
conveys
demonstrates
depicts
describes
displays
explores
expresses
indicate
means
presents
reflects
represents
reveals
suggests
symbolises
accentuates
amplifies
focuses
highlights
reinforces
strengthens
supports
achieves
affects
engages
creates
illustrates
implies
proves<
resolves
uses

 

Other ways of writing "creates a feeling of…" conveys a sense of creates a sense of
emphasises (makes stronger) her feeling of
engenders (brings about) a feeling of
evokes (brings up)a feeling of
generates a feeling of
highlights her feeling of
portrays (shows) a feeling of
suggests that

 

Explaining ideas Putting ideas in order Cause and effect Concluding words
As already stated
For instance
In other words
Namely
Such as
That is
Afterwards
Finally
Firstly
Further<
Importantly Initially
Lastly
Later
Most
Next
Secondly
Then
As a result
Consequently
For
For that reason
Hence
So
Therefore
Thus
All in all…
All this evidence points to…
All this leads to…
All this suggests that…
Consequently
Finally
In conclusion<
This results in
To sum up

Download a PDF poster of these tables.

Go To Top

Belonging extended response questions


In your answer you will be assessed on how well you:


Outcomes to be assessed: ESL:

1.1 Students learn about the ways meaning is shaped through the relationship between composer, responder, text and context by identifying features of particular texts and describing their effects on meaning.

2.2 Students learn about the relationships among texts by describing and explaining the connections between texts.

3.4 Students learn to understand cultural reference in texts by showing understanding of key cultural attitudes, beliefs and values underlying issues and language in texts.

4.4 Students learn to use the language relevant to their study of English including language of critical expression.

5.1 Students learn to understand how audience and purpose affect the language and structure of texts by identifying the language features and structures of texts composed for different audiences and purposes.

8.2 Students learn to adapt a variety of textual forms appropriately in all modes by identifying the effects of the language forms and features, and the structure of texts.

9.1 Students learn about the ways they can respond to texts by analysing in detail texts in a range of modes and media.

11.2 Students learn to synthesise information and ideas into sustained and logical argument by making connections between and synthesising information and ideas for various purposes and audiences.

  1. ESSAY

    How have the texts you have studied portrayed different perceptions of belonging?

    In your answer, refer to TWO prescribed texts. You must also refer to ONE text of your own choosing.

  2. ESSAY
    "Attitudes to belonging change over time."

    Discuss how the composers of the texts you have studied track the shifts in attitudes to belonging.

    In your response, refer to your TWO prescribed texts and ONE text of your own choosing.

  3. ESSAY
    "Acceptance of oneself, one's past and one's future is essential in a search for belonging."

    Discuss how the complexity of belonging is explored in the texts you have studied.

    In your response, refer to your TWO prescribed texts and ONE text of your own choosing.

  4. ESSAY
    "Choosing not to belong is not an easy path."

    How do the composers of the texts you have studied explore the difficulty of difference?

    In your response, refer to your TWO prescribed texts and ONE text of your own choosing.

  5. ESSAY
    "Social behaviour can lead to a sense of alienation."

    Discuss how the importance of individual actions in creating a sense of belonging or non-belonging is investigated in the texts you have studied.

    In your response, refer to your TWO prescribed texts and ONE text of your own choosing.

  6. ESSAY
    "Good relationships are central to a firm sense of belonging."

    To what extent is this statement true?

    In your answer, refer to TWO prescribed texts. You must also refer to ONE text of your own choosing.

  7. ESSAY
    What have you learned about the concept of belonging from your studies this year?

    In your answer, refer to TWO prescribed texts. You must also refer to ONE text of your own choosing.

  8. SPEECH
    You are presenting at a conference entitled, "Perceptions of Belonging."

    Write and present a speech addressing this topic.

    In your response, refer to your TWO prescribed texts and ONE text of your own choosing.

  9. FEATURE ARTICLE
    Write a feature article interviewing THREE composers.

    The article will explore the impact of the composers' personal, cultural, historical and social contexts on the development of their texts.

    In your response, refer to your TWO prescribed texts and ONE text of your own choosing.

  10. RADIO INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT:
    You are hosting a radio interview with THREE composers.

    You are to discuss how these two composers explore the barriers to belonging in their texts.

    In your response, refer to your TWO prescribed texts and ONE text of your own choosing.

Refer to Board of Studies Marking Criteria (external website)

Go To Top

Belonging extended response scaffold

Think about how you would answer a general extended response question about belonging.

If you are given an extended response topic that asks you about the concept of belonging in general, without focusing on particular rubric statements, you may want to focus on three belonging ideas. Writing about one belonging idea at a time will allow you greater opportunity to synthesise your two prescribed texts and related text(s), showing the interrelationships among texts. [Please note that if you are studying poetry as a prescribed text, you will be required to write about AT LEAST TWO individual poems.]

Below is a scaffold of a suggestion of how to write an extended response using this structure:

How have the texts you have studied explored the concept of belonging?

In your answer, refer to TWO prescribed texts. You must also refer to ONE text of your own choosing.

Plan essay:

What 3 big ideas about belonging do I want to write about?

  1. ___________________________________________________________
  2. ___________________________________________________________
  3. ___________________________________________________________

What examples can I use for each big idea?(Make sure you have different examples for each big idea. You may want to use EARLIER examples for the first big idea, MIDDLE examples for the second big idea, and LATER examples for the third big idea.)

1. 1st big idea:
_______________________________________________________________________

1st prescribed text:
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________

2nd prescribed text:

_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________

Related text:
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________

2. 2nd big idea:
_______________________________________________________________________

1st prescribed text:
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________

2nd prescribed text:
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________

Related text:
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________

3. 3rd big idea:
_______________________________________________________________________

1st prescribed text:
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________

2nd prescribed text:
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________

Related text:
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________

Introduction:

(Link to the question. Introduce the texts. Summarise the three ideas about belonging. Summarise how the texts explore these three ideas, making some comparisons.)

 

 

 

 

 

1st big idea about belonging: _________________________________________

(Link to the question. Summary of big idea about belonging and how all texts explore this idea. Discussion of examples from 1st prescribed text that explore this idea.)

 

 

 

 

 

(Discussion of 2nd prescribed text and how examples explore the first big idea, with some comparison to 1st prescribed text)

 

 

 

 

 

(Discussion of a related text and how examples explore the first big idea, with some comparison to 1st and 2nd prescribed texts.)

 

 

 

 

 

2nd big idea about belonging: _________________________________________

(Link to the question. Summary of big idea about belonging and how all texts explore this idea. Discussion of examples from 1st prescribed text that explore this idea.)

 

 

 

 

 

(Discussion of 2nd prescribed text and how examples explore the second big idea, with some comparison to 1st prescribed text)

 

 

 

 

 

(Discussion of a related text and how examples explore the second big idea, with some comparison to 1st and 2nd prescribed texts)

 

 

 

 

 

3rd big idea about belonging: _________________________________________

(Link to the question. Summary of big idea about belonging and how all texts explore this idea. Discussion of examples from 1st prescribed text that explore this idea.)

 

 

 

 

 

(Discussion of 2nd prescribed text and how examples explore the third big idea, with some comparison to 1st prescribed text)

 

 

 

 

 

(Discussion of a related text and how examples explore the third big idea, with some comparison to 1st and 2nd prescribed text)

 

 

 

 

 

Conclusion:

(Link back to the question. Summarise the three big ideas and the texts. Discuss how these texts impact the responder.)

 

 

 

 

 

Download an interactive PDF version of this activity.

Go To Top

Example extended response - Extracts

Below is a plan for an extended response and extracts from an extended response written using this scaffold.

Complete the activities to understand the features of a strong extended response:

How have the texts you have studied explored the concept of belonging?

In your answer, refer to TWO prescribed texts. You must also refer to ONE text of your own choosing.

Essay Plan

  1. Three big ideas about belonging:
    • A sense of belonging comes from a feeling of connection to people, places, communities…
    • An individual can choose not to belong.
    • Perceptions of belonging can be modified over time

  2. Examples for each big idea:
    A sense of belonging comes from a feeling of connection to people, places, communities…
    RPF = Beginning- Aerial panning shot of the desert/ Molly, Maude and the spirit bird
    "Feliks Skrzynecki" = Beginning- Feliks's connection to garden and Polish friends
    "Postcard" = Beginning- Persona's ambiguous sense of connection to Warsaw- "haunts"; friend's perception that his parents will appreciate it.

    An individual can choose not to belong.
    RPF = "Ghost" Miss Jessup when they arrive/ Escape scene
    "Feliks Skrzynecki" = Persona choosing not to belong to Polish friends: "too violently"/ Persona making a choice to "pitch his tents/ Further and further south/ Of Hadrian's Wall."
    "Postcard" = Persona rejecting Warsaw: "I never knew you"/ asking "What's my choice/ To be?"

    Attitudes towards belonging can be modified over time.
    RPF = Neville - unchanged at end/ Molly unchanged at end as elderly woman - circular
    "Feliks Skrzynecki" = Persona - ambiguity at end over where he belongs- his father's attitude has not changed, but the persona is uncertain.
    "Postcard" = End - persona realises that he must confront his heritage at some stage in the future: "We will meet/ Before you die" - circular

Introduction:

The process of studying the concept of belonging has opened my eyes to the importance of one's connection to their cultural heritage to a feeling of belonging.  Phillip Noyce's film Rabbit Proof Fence, Peter Skzynecki's poems "Feliks Skrzynecki" and "Postcard and _________________'s _____________ "________________" all powerfully explore the concept of belonging and the centrality of culture through a variety of film, poetic and ___________ techniques. In particular, all four texts investigate how a sense of belonging arises from a feeling of connection to places, with Molly's connection to land and her mother, Feliks's connection to his garden and Polish friends, the persona's contrasting lack of connection to Warsaw in "Postcard" and __________________________________. The idea that an individual can choose not to belong is explored in Molly's escape from Moore River Training settlement, the persona's rejection of his father's Polish friends in "Feliks Skrzynecki" and his rejection of Warsaw in "Postcard," and _________________ _______________. Yet the texts differ in their portrayal of the idea that attitudes towards belonging may be modified over time. While the persona in "Feliks Skrzynecki" and "Postcard" ambiguously changes his attitudes towards his Polish heritage, Molly and Mr Neville do not change their attitudes in Rabbit Proof Fence. Each text powerfully explores the significance of culture to a sense of belonging through a variety of techniques.

1st aspect of belonging:

Each text studied presents a clever exploration of the idea that a sense of belonging comes from a connection made to cultural places and communities. Throughout Phillip Noyce's Rabbit Proof Fence, Molly has a strong sense of connection to the land and to her family. At the beginning of the film, there is a tracking aerial shot of the changing Australian landscape and Molly's voiceover, speaking in her traditional Aboriginal language. As she says, "Our people, the Jigalong people, we were a desert people then, walking all over our land," the responder sees her land from above. Presenting the responder with her land and her voice, speaking in the first person possessive, positions the responder to sympathise with her and to value her vital connection to her land and people. The aerial shot also places us and her in the same position as the Spirit Bird, her totem, who her mother tells her at the beginning of the film, "will always look after you." The close up, high angle shot of Maude embracing Molly and playing with her hair creates a feeling of their kinship and the intimate relationship between Aboriginal individuals, families and their land. Thus, the film opens with a strong sense of the importance of a sense of connection to people and places in fostering a sense of belonging.

Similarly, Feliks in Peter Skzynecki's poem "Feliks Skzynecki" also feels a close connection to places and people. Yet he has a firm relationship to a place that is not his cultural homeland, but rather a place where he has migrated. He is described at the beginning of the poem as loving "his garden like an only child", sweeping "its paths/ Ten times around the world." The simile and hyperbole evoke a sense of his dedication to his garden and his paternal feelings towards it, connecting to this place like a father connects to an only child. His sense of belonging also comes from his close connection to his Polish friends who "reminisced/ About farms where paddocks flowered/ […] Horses they bred […]." The accumulation of positive verbs conveys a sense of their nostalgia and shared pride in their cultural heritage; a heritage that connects them together and fosters a sense of belonging.

Contrastingly, the persona in "Postcard" does not feel the same sense of connection to his homeland that his father feels, but rather feels alienated and disengaged. The postcard of Warsaw "sent by a friend" "Haunts" him "since its arrival." The eerie connotations of "haunts" and its position on a line by itself portray the persona's unease and uncertain connection to this place. This contrasts to his friend's perception that his parents will react positively to this postcard, feeling a sense of connection to it: "He requests I show it/ To my parents." The separation of "I" and his parents on a separate line suggests their different perceptions to the postcard. This alienation from this place comes from his lack of direct experience of it, contrasting with Molly's experience of her land and Feliks's time spent in his garden and with his friends.

[2nd aspect of belonging discussed for all texts.]
[3rd aspect of belonging described for all texts.]

Conclusion:

Indeed, all four texts prove that ties to culture, place and communities are nearly impossible to break. Even if an individual is taken away or tries to reject their homeland or cultural heritage, the land and their family will call and draw them back. Molly is irrevocably attached to her land and people, while the persona in "Feliks Skrzynecki" and "Postcard" realises that he needs to confront his cultural heritage to make sense of his identity. The composers of these texts powerfully present these ideas through film, poetic and ______________ techniques. Indeed, these texts leave me with an unwavering sense that it is nearly impossible to break a sense of belonging to homeland and people- even if you try to resist or reject it, it will call to you. Studying belonging has made me realise that I must honour my connection to my cultural heritage and community.

Analysing the extended response:

  1. Label the three sections of the essay (the three big ideas about belonging discussed)
  2. Summarise the main thesis of the extended response. How was this thesis presented?
  3. Highlight examples of synthesis of texts.
  4. Circle the techniques that were discussed.
  5. Underline examples of integration of quotations (making the quote part of the sentence).
  6. Write a reflection analysing what you can do to make your extended response writing more successful. What have you learned from deconstructing this extended response?

Download an annotated version of this activity.

Go To Top

Neals logo | Copyright | Disclaimer | Contact Us | Help