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CPCCCM2001A Read and interpret plans and specifications

Introduction

This unit specifies the competency required to read and interpret plans and specifications relevant to General Construction operations.

The unit includes the identification of types of plans and drawings and their functions, the recognition of commonly used symbols and abbreviations, the identification of key features and specifications on a site plan, the comprehension of written job specifications and the recognition of document status and amendment detail.

Plan printing cartoon

With kind permission of Construction Industry Training Board (CITB)

Checking the plan

with kind permission of Lend Lease.

Key terms and concepts

Types of structures could include:

Why do we have plans?
People who may have an interest in plans for proposed structures
What will the plans show the interested parties?
What types of plans do I need to be familiar with?

Why do we have plans?

People who may have an interest in plans for proposed structures:

What will the plans show the interested parties?

They will:

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What types of plans do I need to be familiar with?

Location plan
Site or Block Plan
Floor Plans
Elevations
Sections
Detailed Drawings
Specifications
A Title Block
Waste Management Plans, Site Management Plans
Landscape Plans
Shadow Diagrams
Bracing Schedules

Location Plan

A location plan may be required if it is a big development so that the relative location of the site in a particular street is clear. It will show lot numbers, deposit plan numbers and a north point, using various scales but usually 1:5,000.

Location Plan
Location plan

Reproduced with kind permission of CITB (external website).

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Site or Block Plan

A Site or Block Plan is usually drawn at 1:500 and gives the following information.

Site plan

Reproduced with kind permission of CITB (external website).

Features to look for on plans.

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Floor Plans

Floor plan

Reproduced with kind permission of CITB

What do floor plans identify?

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Elevations

Examples of elevation views

Reproduced with kind permission of CITB

An elevation is a view you see when standing in front of that wall. It may be multi-storey or single-storey, usually drawn to a scale of 1:100. This scale can vary.

Most councils require an elevation from each side of the proposed development and the view is indicated by north, south, east or west - e.g. If the wall is on the west side of the house, it is the west elevation.

Elevations indicate:

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Sections

Elevation section

Reproduced with kind permission of CITB.

What is a section?

It is a vertical view (“slice�) through the building. The direction of section lines or arrows is usually shown on the plan to help interpret the sectional view.

Sections may be required to indicate:

Detailed Drawings

Detailed Drawings are used to illustrate the particular method of construction or finish required - e.g. structural steelwork, concrete work, brickwork. They are usually drawn at scales that are easy to read (1:20, 1:5) .

Specifications

Specifications set out the minimum standards or codes necessary to obtain relevant sizes for all structural components.Specifications may also detail the fixtures and fittings. It will not indicate utilities such as water or electricity.

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A Title Block

A Title Block is a section of information on a plan. It shows:

Glossary of Terms (Read Interpret Plans)

NOTE:
The Australian Architectural Standards details must be used to indicated items, dimensions, products and names on plans.

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Projections, standards & abbreviations

Click on the following examples which are reproduced with the kind permission of CITB (external website)

Symbols PDF
Hatching PDF
Abbreviations 1 PDF
Abbreviations 2 PDF
Architectural conventions 1 PDF
Architectural conventions 2 PDF
Architectural conventions 3 PDF

Waste Management Plans, Site Management Plans

Waste Management Plan Demolition Waste PDF
Waste Management Plan PDF
On going management of waste PDF
D.C.P. for Site Environmental Management Plan

(Reproduced with kind permission of Sutherland Shire Council)

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Landscape Plans

These may be required for building or development approval indicate the extent, type and potential height of flora to be planted.

Here is a typical landscape plan - TIF image (800kB)

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Shadow Diagrams

These indicate the amount of shadow cast by the proposal on adjoining properties. They are sometimes required by the approving authority.

Shadow Diagram

Bracing Schedules

These indicate the type, position and amount of fixing required when installing bracing to timber frames. They are mainly drawn up by the frame supplier, however engineers, draftspersons and builders may also become involved. Approving authorities now require these schedules more often.

Click on Hudsons timber frame bracing schedule PDF

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Assessment requirements

It is essential that you can:

Method of Assessment

In the workplace

Plans need to be viewed at the site regularly to determine the correct position, size and finish of:

Plans also need to be protected from damage, weather and misuse on the worksite.

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